Popkin’s Article

One of the most important aspects of Popkin’s article is tree diversity. Without tree diversity, animals who depend on missing trees will either die out, or invade/migrate to new areas. Animals that have migrated may push out resident populations in that area. These newly migrated animals may also consume all of the vegetation, causing an effect on the pollinators in the area. For example, deers are known to eat certain species of flowers (https://www.almanac.com/content/deer-resistant-plants). If there are too many deer in an area, and they eat a majority of the flowers, then our local honeybee population may die out.

In Popkin’s article, she discusses how the Beech tree is taking over many forests. These, which are unappetizing to deers, will continue to expand and use up a majority of the nutrients in the soil. If other trees, like the beech tree, continue to take over forests, then it will end up costing a lot of money. Without important trees like Ash, then we will see a spike in the price of furniture made with wood.

Another important point she makes is that there is free food everywhere! While we gorge ourselves with store bought fruits, we could easily save a few dollars by eating fresh mulberries right in our own backyard.

Article Link: https://www.nytimes.com/2017/08/26/opinion/sunday/cure-yourself-of-tree-blindness.html

Red Mulberry (Morus rubra)

  

Leaf Arrangement: Alternate

Leaf ComplexitySimple

Leaf Margin: Both Lobed and serrated (toothed)

Location: Grove City, Ohio

Habitat: Small woodland

Other Traits: 4 main veins meet at the base, some leaves are not lobed, upright plant

Interesting Fact: Did you know that Native Americans would use the fruit from mulberry trees to treat dysentery? (Source: http://www.museum.state.il.us/muslink/forest/htmls/trees/M-rubra.html)

 

Pin Oak (Quercus palustris)

Leaf Arrangement: Alternate

Leaf ComplexitySimple

Leaf Margin: Lobed

Location: Grove City, Ohio

Habitat: Small woodland

Other Traits: Leaves are lobed with bristle-tips. It’s hard to see in the leaf image, but there are needle-like appendages on the apex of each lobe. Also, the acorn is shaped like a saucer.

Interesting Fact: Although the Pin oak is a very strong tree, it tends to warp. Due to this, the wood is used as fuel. (Source https://plants.usda.gov/factsheet/pdf/fs_qupa2.pdf)

Shagbark Hickory (Carya ovata) 

 

Leaf Arrangement: Alternate

Leaf ComplexityPinnately Compound

Leaf Margin: Entire

Location: Grove City, Ohio

Habitat: Dense woodland

Other Traits: Major feature was the shaggy bark. Other strong features included the numerous fruits hanging from the tree, and the five leaflets.

Interesting Fact: Did you know the Shagbark hickory tree has wood with high shock resistance? Because of this, sports equipment is usually made from this wood. Baseball bats are great examples of wood that needs shock resistance. (http://www.museum.state.il.us/muslink/forest/htmls/trees/C-ovata.html)

White Ash Tree (Fraxinus americana)

Leaf Arrangement:Opposite 

Leaf ComplexityPinnately Compound

Leaf Margin: Entire

Location: Grove City, Ohio

Habitat: Small woodland

Other Traits: Twigs were not velvet-like or powdery, the twigs were round, and the ash fruits were pointed at both ends.

 Interesting Fact: Did you know the white ash is used to make Louisville slugger baseball bats? (Source: https://www.lakeforest.edu/academics/programs/environmental/courses/es282/fraxinus_americana.php)

Frosted Hawthorn (Crataegus pruinosa)

Leaf Arrangement: Alternate

Leaf ComplexitySimple

Leaf Margin: Serrate

Location: Grove City, Ohio

Habitat: Small woodland

Other Traits: Extremely large thorns located on the truck and branches, circular red fruits, leaf base is flat and wide.

Interesting Fact: Hawthorn can simply be translated as thorny hedge. Did you know that herbalists use the leaves of hawthorn trees as a nicotine substitute for people trying to quit smoking. (Source: https://www.hunker.com/12320994/hawthorn-tree-facts) Hawthorn is hypothesized to be effective at treating heart diseases, such as congestive heart failure; however more research is needed to prove this. (Source: https://www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-527/hawthorn)

Honey locust (Gleditsia triacanthos)

Leaf Arrangement: Alternate

Leaf ComplexityPinnately compound, but also twice compounded

Leaf Margin: Entire

Location: Grove City, Ohio

Habitat: Small woodland

Other Traits: Massive thorns on the trunk, smaller thorns on twigs ~ 3 in, and compounded leaflets

Interesting Fact: Did you know the honey locus seeds can be used as a coffee substitute? All you have to do is roast and grind the seeds. (Source: https://gardenerdy.com/honey-locust-tree-facts). Also, the substances within the honey locust may prove to be effective at combatting certain cancers and rheumatoid arthritis (Source: https://naturewalk.yale.edu/trees/fabaceae/gleditsia-triacanthos/honey-locust-18)

Common Cottonwood (Populus deltoides)

Leaf Arrangement: Alternate

Leaf ComplexitySimple

Leaf Margin: Serrate/Slightly-wavy

Location: Grove City, Ohio

Habitat: Small woodland

Other Traits: Thornless, leaves with wavy-edges, the bark near the top of the tree is smooth and whitish, buds located directly above leaf scar, roundish leaves, and buds lie flat against twigs.

Interesting Fact: Did you know the common cottonwood is adapated to be drought tolerant? Also, these trees pollinate via wind (Source: https://www.fs.fed.us/database/feis/plants/tree/popdel/all.html#BOTANICAL%20AND%20ECOLOGICAL%20CHARACTERISTICS)

 

Black Willow (Salix nigra)

Leaf Arrangement: Alternate

Leaf Complexity: Simple

Leaf Margin: Entire

Location: Grove City, Ohio

Habitat: Edge of woods, near a pound

Other Traits: Leaves are very long and pointed, and somewhat droopy.

Interesting Fact: Did you know that the Black willow is usually found near ponds, rivers, and streams? (http://forestry.ohiodnr.gov/blackwillow). Also, the bark of this plant has been used as a pain reliever, and the roots have been used to treat headaches (https://plants.usda.gov/plantguide/pdf/pg_sani.pdf).