FLOWER ANALYSIS WORKSHEET

Flower #1

This flower was found here:  Whetstone Park, Columbus, Ohio. In a field growing most densely near a partially buried pipe.

It is on page _192_ in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name_____Lady’s Thumb______ ‚ Scientific name: __Polygonum persicaria  

Corolla:  number of petals __n/a__ ‚ separate or fused? ___________

Calyx:    number of sepals __5__ separate or fused?____Fused____

Androecium: number of stamens ___6__  and do not extend past the sepals

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or syncarpous (and # of carpels =__3__)
How can you tell? The three sided ovaries.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or perigynous or epigynous?__Perigynous___

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular) 

Additional distinctive features: A dark spot roughly centered on the lancet-like leaves (second photo)

FLOWER ANALYSIS WORKSHEET

Flower #2

This flower was found here: Whetstone Park, Columbus, Ohio along a tree line in a floodplain

It is on page _200_ in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name_____Pokeweed______ ‚ Scientific name: _______Phytolacca americana________

Corolla:  number of petals __n/a_ separate or  fused? ___________

Calyx:    number of sepals __5__ separate or fused?__Separate___

Androecium: number of stamens __10__ separate.

Gynoecium type: syncarpous (and # of carpels = 10_)
How can you tell? Dissected ovary shows 10 distinct chambers (second photo)

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or perigynous or epigynous? _Hypogynous_____

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular)

Additional distinctive features: Rounded, white sepals around relatively large gynoecium (sort of looks like a thick tomato doesn’t it?)

FLOWER ANALYSIS WORKSHEET

Flower #3

This flower was found here: Whetstone Park, Columbus, Ohio in a thicket near the tree line

It is on page _130_ in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name_________Jumpseed______________  Scientific name: __Tovara virginiana  

Corolla:  number of petals __4__ separate or fused? ___Fused___

Calyx:   number of sepals _N/A__ separate or fused?_____________

Adroecium: number of stamens __4__ separate

Gynoecium type: unicarpellate, apocarpous, or  syncarpous (and # of carpels =_____)
How can you tell? (Cite the features were apparent about the number of carpels.)

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous, or perigynous or epigynous?_Hypogynous 

Flower symmetry: actinomorphic (regular)

FLOWER ANALYSIS WORKSHEET

Flower #4

This flower was found here: Thicket on the edge of a wetland, Whetstone Park, Columbus, Ohio.

It is on page _54__ in Newcomb’s Wildflowers

Common name _Spotted touch-me-not_‚ Scientific name: __Impatiens capensis___

Corolla:  number of petals __5__  separate or fused? ___Fused_____

Calyx:   number of sepals __3__ separate or fused?__separate_____

Adroecium: number of stamens __5   

Gynoecium type: syncarpous (and # of carpels =__5__)
How can you tell? Cluster of 5 white pistils.

Flower type/ovary position: Hypogynous

Flower symmetry: zygomorphic (irregular)?

Additional distinctive features: _Orange flowers with brownish spots and a long nectar spur at the back of the flower that runs parallel to the petals.

 

Do you know what it’s time for now? More wildflowers!

This group of purple flowers is from the plant tall ironweed, or Vernonia altissima. This example was found along a tree line in Whetstone Park, but the plant can also be found in moist meadows according to Newcombe’s Wildflower Guide. Some distinctive features include lance-shaped leaves with fine teeth (seen in the second photo) and short, pointed bracts below the flower groupings that sort of look like scales.

This little white flower is from heath aster, or Aster pilosus. According to Newcombe’s, these flowers can be found in fields, meadows, and along roads. This particular example was found in a prairie restoration zone of Whetstone Park. Some distinctive features include the stiff bracts below the flower head, the numerous white flower rays, and yellow center disc of flowers.

These yellow and brown flowers are called orange coneflowers, or Rudbeckia fulgidaNewcombe’s says these flowers pop up in dry to moist open areas, and these specific ones were found in the same prairie restoration patch as the previous flower. Some distinctive features include the seven yellow flower rays that darken towards the center disc, the brown dome-like disc, and toothed lower leaves.

The fantastic final flower for this folio is the tall sunflower, Helianthus giganteus. Again, this flower was found in the prairie tract at Whetstone, and can be found in swamps and damp thickets according to Newcombe’s. Distinguishing features include the lance-shaped leaves with very shallow teeth, the hairy and coarse stem, and the long bracts beneath the flower head.